About Joe shoots resurrected cameras

I am primarily a musician/songwriter/composer currently studying music at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs. I also take pictures.

Family Gathering 2016

The main event.  A much more joyous occasion than two years ago, we met in Manassas, VA for my cousin’s wedding.  He’s the last cousin to get married, which probably means my brother’s and my days are numbered…

At least we’ll be able to put them through a long plane flight like the ones I’ve had to endure the last few years!

The trial and error continues.  Since last spring I’ve made it a point to shoot and get the hang of Ektar 100…it still hasn’t happened yet.  Maybe it’s the lack of sunlight that skews the color temperature, or the fact that with a manual camera I’m not getting a proper exposure, or that I didn’t perform a whole lot of color correction in post.  Whatever the reason, the unsatisfying results are just one more reason that I’ll shoot keep shooting the consumer-variety films.

Ferrania P30 to be released this month!

What else can I say about this?  Except that it’s amazing.

ferraniap30alpha
http://www.filmferrania.it/p30

And also I’m glad that while color reversal is still on the way, that I’ll be able to shoot Ferrania film by the end of February.  It’ll be in its alpha release and if you’re a Kickstarter backer, check your email already.  And if not, it should be selling in Ferrania’s online store in 2 weeks.  What a great time to be alive.

https://petapixel.com/2017/02/01/film-ferrania-returns-grave-unveils-new-p30-bw-35mm-film/

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Love those trains

Well actually, my brother was the train buff when we were growing up, but my fascination with old technology has worked its way to these wonderful contraptions.  Especially steam locomotives: properly maintained, they can work for centuries and besides that they look wonderful.  Engine 169 from the Denver & Rio Grande railroad is a good candidate for restoration, and had been saved and preserved in Alamosa, CO.

William Jackson Palmer was born and raised a Quaker in Pennsylvania, went into the railroad business, but felt so strongly about the cause of Abolition that he joined the Union Army during the Civil War, and suffered consequences of that from his family and church.  He served with distinction, rose to the rank of General, and was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor by President Lincoln himself.  After the war, he went back into railroads, came out West, and founded his own railroad running North-South.  The D&RG intersected most other railroads there at the time, and connected many mining towns along the Front Range that had sprung up supplying miners going into the Rockies looking for gold.  General Palmer founded the town of Colorado Springs and lived there the rest of his life.  I was happy to see a Springs connection in Alamosa when I went there for the Southern Colorado Film Festival.

There was a railroad that I considered riding after the festival, but ended up not having time for unfortunately.  I did go into their yard and take a few pics of some of their engines and cars; some are in better condition than others.  What I didn’t see and wish I had was a mid-century diesel engine, though there were later electric engines, though perhaps they were in a different spot.  Alamosa seems to be a repository of old train cars and I hope these will end up being preserved as well.

It’s growing on me…

I’ve always been more a fan of Fuji when it comes to color, even with Ektar, which really, I’ve yet to get the hang of.  However, I’ve seen so many good results for Kodak Gold 200, thanks to its popularity on the Pakon F135 users’ group on Facebook, and I decided to give it a go myself.

I have to say, I’m quite happy with what it can do so far.  As a plus, it’s readily available at the grocery store near my mom’s house, at a price of $9.00 per 3-pack no less.  I’ll definitely shoot more.

Yes, it’s that soft…

Do you know how rare it is to find a lens from the 1950s that isn’t scratched to hell, or at least loaded with cleaning marks?  Pretty rare indeed.  In fact, I had been holding off cleaning it until I got myself a UV filter for it (41mm is a pretty rare size for filters).  The plan was to clean it as gently as possible, screw the filter on, and never take it off again.  Good plan, but guess what…my best wasn’t gentle enough, and looking through the glass now, I wouldn’t call this lens near-mint condition anymore.  Ugh…

 

Ektachrome returns!

Because there is a God.  Having kept up with Facebook communities, I know how much demand there was for this, so I’m happy that it’s finally happening.  Kodak Ektachrome will be coming back to motion picture and still photography.  I’m so happy I’ll be able to shoot this film in a year or so.  Read the official press announcement here:

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/corp/Press_center/Kodak_Brings_Back_a_Classic_with_EKTACHROME_Film/default.htm

I remember hearing an interview with Jeff Clarke where he said that Kodak wanted to bring back Ektachrome, but had to choose between that and the new super 8 camera, as to which one first.  Well, it seems that we didn’t have long to wait after all.  A year from now, we’ll be shooting brand new Kodak Ektachrome.

Long live film.

http://www.kodakalaris.com/en-us/about/press-releases/2016/kodak-alaris-reintroduces-iconic-ektachrome-still-film