Jeep tours 2018, Super 8 edition, Part II

More screenshots from this Summer’s film processing.  I do it as cheaply as possible but the costs do add up.  Leaving the film out of it the total for me was still somewhere around $600 for 30min of footage.

Great memories, though, and hopefully I will get that documentary made at some point.

Mule deer procession

This is the road my mom’s house is on; I was just getting off work for the day and had been testing out (in order): my black F Apollo, a chrome F, and a chrome F2 Photomic (I’ve been building up the system).  I had moved on to my black F2A for the last few shots, and found an aspen tree on my mom’s road that had turned a dark red (rather rare, though I saw more this year than ever before); the sun was setting and I just happened to be there at the perfect time for the sun to light up the leaves.  I also happened to be there at the perfect time to see a family of mule deer cross the road:

Perhaps you remember from an earlier post just how friendly the deer can be around here?  Well they didn’t come right up to me and say hello but they certainly didn’t give me a second thought even though I was probably 6-8 feet away from them when I shot this series.

Oh deer…

Photographing my mom’s neighbors who came over for a block party in her backyard.  I think I’ve talked about tame deer before…these were shot with the 50mm lens, because it was the longest I had at the time.

This was about as close as they’d let me get before moving back to maintain a respectful 6ft distance, very conscientious deer…

This was from my first roll of Tri-X through the F Apollo

Jeep tours 2017, Super 8 edition, Part I

Bugs, birds, sheep, hotshots, and old vehicles.  These are some of my favorite shots of the Super 8 footage I took 3 years ago now.  As much as I talk about  film photography being affordable, I have to admit that motion picture film expenses can pile up quickly, even when shopping around for the best price.  In 2017 I shot 15 rolls of super 8, but never set aside money to get everything developed and scanned, so it’s been sitting in my mom’s freezer for the last 3 years.  What else was I spending my money on back then?  Film festivals, I suppose.  I still have 11 rolls from 2018 that I haven’t sent off for processing yet; I was planning on making a documentary but put that all on hold to concentrate on photo project stuff instead.  Now I’m taking the time to get all my footage in shape so I can decide how to proceed on the documentary front.

Shout out to Nicholas Coyle Film & Video for the incredible 5K scans, I’m using up all the campaign contributions I made with this documentary project.  I cropped to a 1.66:1 ratio, but nothing has been color/contrast graded yet. that will take considerably more time I’m sure.  Nick told me the film was a bit fogged, understandable considering how long it’s been in my mom’s freezer.

Project part 2 – Advanced Photography (redux)

This is when I finally got some photos that I was proud of, and that the photo class liked.  In many cases they don’t have too much to do with my final conception but there are hints here and there, just in need of refining.

The other thing is that these were taken in February and March or thereabouts and really I didn’t have much going on work-wise but it ramps up quickly after that, as it’s about to now again.

Jeep tours 2018, Part I

As another season comes to a close I realize I have an incredible backlog!  I’ve posted some pics of last year’s season, but I’ve grouped the majority of the pictures here (there’s a Part II as well).  They’re separated by camera because I’m pretty sure that these were taken with the Canon 7.  However, that said, it was so long between when I shot them and when I actually looked at them: I think there was a roll in there shot on the Spotmatic.

Anyway the Canon 7 has taken a few hard knocks and the rangefinder patch is out of alignment.  I haven’t used it for about a year now, haven’t gotten around to sending it out for a CLA.  Another thing to note is that while I usually take my film to Cameraworks, all the rolls of film last year were processed by Mike’s Camera in Boulder.

Color negative film in the Trip 35

I’ve shot color film in the Trip before, but it was always slide film.  I was a bit afraid that the lens wouldn’t be contrasty enough for color negative film, remembering my experiment with the Leitz Summarit.  But I went ahead and risked a $3 roll of Gold 200, and I’m glad I did, because I think these pictures look pretty nice.

So main point to take away?  You won’t know what works until you try.  And now I know that the Olympus Trip 35 is a more versatile camera than I had originally imagined.  I can shoot damn near anything in it and be happy with the results.