A shout out to Nicholas Coyle Film and Video

When I was originally compiling my list of best prices for buying/processing/scanning super 8 film, Nicholas Coyle reached out to me on Facebook and let me know about his scanning house prices which are still the best I’ve found for a 2K scan, and I just used him myself for the first time.  He’s about to be the best price for a 4K scan.

We’ve been in touch for about a year and a half so I knew this was coming: he’s finally upgrading to a Lasergraphics 6.5K Scanstation and is running a special crowdfunding campaign to help with expenses.  So if you were waiting for the right time to get some film scanned, there will never be a better one.  $50 for 3 rolls of super 8, or $100 for 6, or $200 for 12, or $400 for 24: that comes out to $16.67 per roll for a 4K/6.5K flat scan; if you just want to scan 1 roll it’s $15:

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/help-preserve-super8-8mm-16mm-and-35mm-at-6-5k#/

Once he’s up and running the price goes up slightly but I like how it’s tiered: $15 for 2K/3K flat scan (the larger file if you’re want an overscan instead of cropped), $20 for 4K/6.5K, and then $5 more for a one-light transfer, $10 more for a best-light transfer.  Simple and still incredibly affordable compared to the competition: FPP comes close with 4K scans for $35 but there is no information on what the scans will look like, if they’re flat or color-corrected, things of that sort.  At least Coyle’s information is all out in the open and also shipping from him to me is incredibly cheap; he’s only 2 hours away from me.

I already chatted with him so the scanner is coming one way or another in the next couple months, the campaign is to help him pay off some of his initial expenses.  So please consider supporting him, as the price will be hard to beat.  I plan on using Coyle to scan all my film from now on.  Here are a few recent scans:

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A limited exposure test of the new Kodak Ektachrome

I didn’t dedicate too many exposures to bracketing as I’ve learned to trust the AE-1’s meter implicitly and usually have it set on shutter priority mode at somewhere around 1/125sec.

Can you tell which is which?  Because actually I’m not sure I remember!  But I think that the first shot was what my camera thought was the correct exposure, but due to the heavy fog I was afraid that it was going to underexpose so I gave it an extra stop.  And for some reason there’s a bit of a yellow color shift.  But besides that, it’s not terrible, not by a long shot.  Compare to the test I once did with Fuji Provia 100f.

Here’s this shot one more time, which I included in the other post, just auto-exposure on the AE-1, but thematically it fits in with the other pictures.  I am surprised just how muted the greens are here, but that may just be a characteristic of Kodak’s color palate combined with the lack of bright sunlight, and the fact that this is the Kodak answer to Provia, not Velvia.  Maybe someday soon we’ll see E100VS come back.

And here are a few new shots which demonstrate more of the muted colors in the shade.

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Two rolls of Ektachrome E100 (7294)

It looks like Kodak colors!  Over the summer I shot my first two rolls of the new Ektachrome in my Canon AE-1.  I have another roll that I haven’t shot yet.  I was planning on using my SPII for that but it seems to have developed a few shutter problems so maybe in my new Olympus Stylus Infinity.  It being October with the leaves changing color I should have got on that, however I missed my window, just so much else going on.  But here’s what I’ve shot between July and September, though I have to admit that after shooting Tri-X nearly exclusively since sometime last year, I’m a bit out of practice shooting color, but here goes:

I had these developed/scanned by Mike’s Camera, SOP is that I drop the rolls off at the Colorado Springs store so their courier can take to the Boulder store where the E6 processor is.  I asked high-res scans (only 3000×2000 now) on their Noritsu but to send the rolls back uncut so that they could be scanned on the Colorado Springs store’s Fuji Frontier scanner (I’m thinking if I do this enough I should be able to write up a comparison between Noritsu, Fuji, and Pakon scanners…haven’t gotten around to it yet).  Unfortunately, the Boulder store has no concept of how to follow directions and I received cut and mounted slides and the scans were a measly 1818×1228.  And they showed me the tickets, the directions were very saliently written so there’s absolutely no excuse for that to happen.  Thankfully the Colorado Springs store gave me rescans, though I don’t think it was on their Fuji Frontier; they must have some sort of Minolta or Nikon prosumer scanner for mounted slides but I don’t know which model; at least they’re a bit more high-res than what the Boulder store is offering, it’s about 2400dpi.  This gives me the opportunity to compare the Noritsu to what I’m calling right now the Mystery Scanner.


(there was some slight dodging the sunlight areas in this picture)

In nearly every instance I’d choose the Noritsu’s colors over the 2400dpi Mystery Scanner’s.  Nearly

It’s obvious that there’s more detail in the shadows on some of these (different cropping/framing too).  I’m not sure that the Mystery Scanner actually has a better D-Max than a Noritsu, but it does matter who they have operating the machineMike’s Camera in Boulder, you fucked up and I’m not happy.  Think I’ll ever go back?  Maybe someday.  This is the first time I’ve looked at the two scans side-by-side and the Mystery Scanner seems to have some sort of haze/fog as well as a slight color cast I didn’t pick up before.

As far as the film goes, I’m happy with the new Ektachrome.  Is it Provia or Velvia?  No, but when I heard that Fuji was discontinuing their 5-roll packs (which made the film $10-11 per roll), I bought 10 rolls of Velvia 100, stuck it in the freezer, and knew that when I’d shot all that I wouldn’t be buying any more.  I’ve said it before, I love Fuji’s colors.  But at least I know that a couple years from now, I’ll be able to still shoot Ektachrome and it’s actually a good price!  In 135 size that is.  As I write this, Ektachrome is being sold for $13 while Velvia 100 is $18 and Provia 100f is $16.  Ouch.  Considering Ektachrome is priced lower than either and it just came out, that’s great (and hopefully if my predictions are right regarding Fuji, we’ll see the price drop someday).  Now, $40 for a roll of the stuff in super 8, that’s pretty high.

The latest shipment

This summer’s order from Freestyle Photo.  20 rolls of Tri-X for continuing my Cowboys & Jeeps project plus I’m finally going to try out the new Ektachrome.

About this time last year I got a big shipment of super 8 film to continue the documentary.  I might have put that on hold so I can finish this photo project.  I’m on my last roll of Christmas present and already have 6 rolls of this batch in my camera bag right now.

Rolling forward

a.k.a. Quo Vadis II

An update: I spend the summers working and have been extremely busy, then cut back slightly so I can have a day or two just for classes.  I’ll admit, I’ve been so busy that I have been restricting my posts to one or two a month, and all the pictures I’ve posted were shot sometime last year.  Despite my good intentions, I don’t know if that’ll change soon, but I do still roll forward:

I got 25 rolls of film developed back in July, and finally started scanning some of them (the first 8 rolls at least).  It’s good to hear the hum of the Pakon and so wonderful putting an entire roll through every few minutes.

I have 8 more rolls of film in the fridge waiting to be developed, and 17 more rolls to scan though I’ll try to edit as I go, as time permits.  At any rate, I’m running out of drafts in the queue so there will be more recent photos posted soon.

In other news, Ektachrome is back and available in super 8 directly from Kodak’s website.  135 canisters will be available in about 2 weeks from retailers and 16mm is expected by the end of the year.  Unfortunately, together with the $40 price tag (it says it’s an introductory price; hopefully it will drop eventually), there is no student discount available, which makes it nearly twice as expensive for me as all the other films.  I think I’ll be waiting a while, but I wish Kodak all the best!

Ektachrome is getting closer…

The news is a few days old now, but Kodak has announced Ektachrome will be sold starting Oct. 1:

https://www.kodak.com/US/en/corp/Press_center/New_EKTACHROME_Films_to_Begin_Shipping/default.htm

Of course it says that it’s already for sale but every place I’ve checked says it’ll be delivered the middle of the month, but the super 8 will be sold right from Kodak’s website on the 1st.  Damn good news. I can’t say that the price excites me ($13 for a roll of 135 film or $40 for a super 8 cartridge) but I still plan on getting some and shooting it.  If you’re interested in seeing some of the first footage shot with this film, check out Ignacio Benedeti’s blog: http://mimundoensuper-8.blogspot.com/2018/09/ferrol-7294-trailer-especial-para-la.html

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Ektachrome returns!

Because there is a God.  Having kept up with Facebook communities, I know how much demand there was for this, so I’m happy that it’s finally happening.  Kodak Ektachrome will be coming back to motion picture and still photography.  I’m so happy I’ll be able to shoot this film in a year or so.  Read the official press announcement here:

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/corp/Press_center/Kodak_Brings_Back_a_Classic_with_EKTACHROME_Film/default.htm

I remember hearing an interview with Jeff Clarke where he said that Kodak wanted to bring back Ektachrome, but had to choose between that and the new super 8 camera, as to which one first.  Well, it seems that we didn’t have long to wait after all.  A year from now, we’ll be shooting brand new Kodak Ektachrome.

Long live film.

http://www.kodakalaris.com/en-us/about/press-releases/2016/kodak-alaris-reintroduces-iconic-ektachrome-still-film