What happened?

Since I started driving tours in 2016, this truck had been sitting on cinder blocks, in the back lot we rent.  Then one day I drive by and it looked like this:

A few days later, it was gone.

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Up at the Ziplines

I took these when I was up at our company’s ziplines in Manitou Springs.

Except for the picture of me, that was taken at Garden of the Gods.  The beard’s been trimmed since then, but came in handy for the winter months…

The price is reasonable!

I think when I first was looking into shooting bulk rolls for the intermediate photo class Tri-X in 100ft rolls were going for around $125 which made it cheaper to shoot regular 36exp rolls.  I don’t know exactly when that changed but I’m happy to see it!  Every online retailer I’ve looked at so far is asking $76.5 for a 100ft bulk roll of Tri-X!

It’s almost enough to make me get a darkroom set up!  I’m in the process of finishing my photography minor with a 3D studio class, but if I take another photo class before I graduate you can bet I’ll take advantage of this!

4 years ago today

Happy Anniversary to the Resurrected Camera.  Inspired by the Intro to Photography class at my university, I decided to start a photo blog, dedicated to shooting film on the cheap.  It all started on January 1, 2014 with a fake trailer I made using two 35mm cameras and three rolls of film.

Using still images is something that I’ve continued all the way to Overwhelming Majority very recently.  As far as this blog goes, I still don’t quite know what direction to take it in this year, but I do have a few things I’m looking forward to announcing when the time is right.

For the hell of it, I’m releasing another film I made using still cameras, way back in early 2015, just as an assignment for Film Scoring class.  Again, stylistically inspired by Chris Marker’s La Jetee.  It’ll only be available for a limited, unspecified time:

I budgeted 5 rolls of Tri-X, utilizing the Pentax ESII and Spotmatic SPII, and was my first time editing using Final Cut Pro.  Aside from all that, if anyone remembers this post at all, it’s a shot which I couldn’t find a use for in the film.  Until next time, keep finding those deals in the film photography world!

Why I love Tri-X

It’s Thanksgiving, so what am I most thankful for?  Tri-X, of course.

I suppose it’s all about the mood.  There’s a lot of darkness in these photos, perhaps because I tend to use Tri-X where there isn’t a whole lot of light, and it always gets the image.  You can push it, pull it, overexpose or underexpose it and still get results.  It’s the most versatile film I know of, the best damn black and white film ever made.

You will notice that most of what I have here are people.  I suppose that with larger formats it would work great for landscape photography (which I don’t do a whole lot of in black and white), and I was experimenting a bit with caffenol back in the day, pulling film a stop and using a semi-stand development to reduce grain.  Fuji Acros 100 seems to be the king of black & white landscape photography these days, but I’ve always said it’s Kodak for black & white and Fuji for color (and I’ve always said that I’ve always said).  One of these days I’ll mix it up.

I’m not the only person in the world to love Tri-X, it does happen to be the best-selling black and white film in the world.  Because of its latitude and forgiving latitude in not only exposure but also development, it’s used in a lot of photography programs (including mine).  It was used by newspaper photographers from the 1950s to the 1980s, used by combat photographers in Vietnam, and countless street photographers to this day.  Think of a famous black and white photo and chances are it was shot on Tri-X.  Classic Americana.