More Kodak super 8 camera news from CES2018

Yup, two years later and it still isn’t out.  And the price has kept going up.  Honestly it’s been extremely frustrating with all the delays and price increases.  I’ll be honest, I was much more into this camera when it was going to be $400-750.  Right now they say it’ll retail somewhere around $2000-2500, with a release date of Summer 2018.  But it does officially exist:


Although I still want one bad, anymore I’ll have to wait and see just what the final price will be because it seems that even Kodak employees don’t have a final answer.  But if this thing’s gonna cost $2500 I don’t see how I or other students would be able to afford it.  The universities should be able to, though…I hope I can borrow one from mine!

One good thing in there, it seems that if you’re a fan of developing your own movie film (and I’ve met a few who are), you’re not automatically required to buy processing/scanning with the super 8 cartridge so I see that as a plus.  Kodak’s online store has gone back and forth between offering and not offering 16mm and 35mm film, and the price of super 8 film randomly fluctuates, I haven’t seen it advertised at what it should be since summer of 2017.


Good news: Kodak brings back another film

This popped up in my facebook feed this morning.  If you needed further proof that Kodak is confident of the future of film, here it is!

Honestly I’ve never shot this film so I’m glad I’ll get another chance.  Supposedly it’ll be available in March, which means it’ll beat Ektachrome to market. And there’s part of the problem.

Will Kodak actually release it next month?  And where is Ektachrome?  I’m sure it’s a much harder process reformulating E6 films, but I’m getting exasperated having Kodak announce things and still not see anything actually released.  Yet.  Still waiting for the super 8 camera, still waiting for Ektachrome.  Kodak needs to start following through.  I’ll give them a chance but my patience is limited…

edit: They must be really sure of their release date, because all the retailers are accepting preorders!


Cowboys and Jeeps

(If you’re looking at the header group pic, from L to R that’s Buffalo Phil, Twister, Dutch, Scorpion Cowboy, P-Dog, Denim, Rowdy II, Sidewinder, and Dusty)

One thing that my instructor in Intermediate and Advanced Photo taught me was to make projects out of what you happening to be doing.  Since Summer 2016 I have been dressing up like a cowboy and driving jeep tours around Colorado Springs.  Here are some of the shots I’ve gotten when have a free hand (none while driving, I promise).

Besides being an ongoing photo project, I’ve also started making a documentary about life as a tour guide, the growing Colorado Springs tourism industry, and how Colorado and the western states differentiate themselves from the rest of America.  We’re living in the age where cowboys traded in their horses for jeeps.

There have been sprinklings of pics in the past here and there, but not one post dedicated to them.  Some of these pictures date to last summer, and a lot of different rolls of film here, too.  In order: Fujicolor 200, Cinestill 50, Fuji Neopan Acros 100, Kentmere 100/AGFAPhoto APX, Kodak Gold 200, Kodak Tri-X.  I plan to do a lot more shooting and interviewing this summer if I can, but this was conceived as more of a long-term project and probably won’t be finished until I finally graduate, and who knows when that will be…

4 years ago today

Happy Anniversary to the Resurrected Camera.  Inspired by the Intro to Photography class at my university, I decided to start a photo blog, dedicated to shooting film on the cheap.  It all started on January 1, 2014 with a fake trailer I made using two 35mm cameras and three rolls of film.

Using still images is something that I’ve continued all the way to Overwhelming Majority very recently.  As far as this blog goes, I still don’t quite know what direction to take it in this year, but I do have a few things I’m looking forward to announcing when the time is right.

For the hell of it, I’m releasing another film I made using still cameras, way back in early 2015, just as an assignment for Film Scoring class.  Again, stylistically inspired by Chris Marker’s La Jetee.  It’ll only be available for a limited, unspecified time:

I budgeted 5 rolls of Tri-X, utilizing the Pentax ESII and Spotmatic SPII, and was my first time editing using Final Cut Pro.  Aside from all that, if anyone remembers this post at all, it’s a shot which I couldn’t find a use for in the film.  Until next time, keep finding those deals in the film photography world!

Why I love Double-X

Because for some reason Tri-X just isn’t enough for me.  When I want something a bit different I go for the 5222, Eastman Double-X.  Reasons to use Double-X?  Though grainier, it’s sharper, and it gives a different look, lovely tonality.  And cost, if you’re willing to invest in a 400ft roll of the stuff!

Tri-X is an everyday film, Double-X is for special occasions, and I used it for a few specific projects including my 2-semester-long (and just wrapping up) document of making Overwhelming Majority.

This current iteration was developed by Kodak in the late 1950s and then left alone, so it will give you a classic, mid-century look, especially if you use older lenses/cameras. And that is something I recommend!  It requires fairly precise exposure and development can be tricky since it’s designed to be used with Kodak D-96, and anything else will boost the contrast quite a bit.  Using older, low-contrast lenses will tame that somewhat.  I tend to shoot it inside if the light is good enough, or outside on overcast days.  I’ve seen some pretty good results from pushing, etc, though I’ve never had much luck myself.

Here are some great resources if you’re going to shoot Double-X:
Project Double-X (sadly defunct due to the death of its owner)
Through the Viewfinder’s 400ft Roll Project


Why I love Tri-X

It’s Thanksgiving, so what am I most thankful for?  Tri-X, of course.

I suppose it’s all about the mood.  There’s a lot of darkness in these photos, perhaps because I tend to use Tri-X where there isn’t a whole lot of light, and it always gets the image.  You can push it, pull it, overexpose or underexpose it and still get results.  It’s the most versatile film I know of, the best damn black and white film ever made.

You will notice that most of what I have here are people.  I suppose that with larger formats it would work great for landscape photography (which I don’t do a whole lot of in black and white), and I was experimenting a bit with caffenol back in the day, pulling film a stop and using a semi-stand development to reduce grain.  Fuji Acros 100 seems to be the king of black & white landscape photography these days, but I’ve always said it’s Kodak for black & white and Fuji for color (and I’ve always said that I’ve always said).  One of these days I’ll mix it up.

I’m not the only person in the world to love Tri-X, it does happen to be the best-selling black and white film in the world.  Because of its latitude and forgiving latitude in not only exposure but also development, it’s used in a lot of photography programs (including mine).  It was used by newspaper photographers from the 1950s to the 1980s, used by combat photographers in Vietnam, and countless street photographers to this day.  Think of a famous black and white photo and chances are it was shot on Tri-X.  Classic Americana.