Cowboy and horse 4×5

An actual real cowboy, that is, part of a dying breed.  I’m not a real cowboy, I just play one on TV.

He was patriarch of a family of horsewomen that run a stables up in the mountains; when we do horseback riding tours we take them up to his family’s stables.  Sadly he died this Summer and I hardly knew him or got to speak with him.

This is the outtake, the horse was less cooperative than the human.  The more I look at these the more I think that I should print them in a landscape orientation and cut off the top/bottom, they’ll be better framed that way.  I would have done it in camera but I wanted to shoot fast and let the guy get on with his day.

I went back and reviewed my work over the last few years and found several posts with pictures shot up at the stables.  Here they are:
Dutch
Colorado Elk
Project Pt.II, Adv.Photo Redux
Horses
Jeep Tours 2017 Super 8 Edition, Pt.I
Eve’s Cantina

Bowling alley cowboys 4×5

(and cowgirl)

These were from last year’s Christmas party held the end of November, this year at a large place on the North side of Colorado Springs, with bowling, but also laser tag, an arcade, etc.  I told everyone to come dressed in their work outfits and I would take pics, but only a few did which made it into more of a prank than I intended, plus so many people refused to sit still long enough.

Ilford HP5+ pushed to 1600.  The lighting wasn’t terrific and even with the extra 2 stops my shutter speeds were very low.

Eagle Rock 4×5

A guy I had a hand in training.  Actually as I’ve been driving tours for 5 seasons I’ve had a hand in training a majority of the drivers now!

This was toward the beginning of my developing sheet film and is still very splotchy; the other shots that were in the tank at the same time came out better but I think the lighting was a bit more even there.  I only bought one 10-sheet box of Kodak film (T-max 400), I wanted to support the cause but Kodak has given up even trying to compete price-wise in their large format film. 

Uncle Marmot 4×5

Marmot with the GOG Trolley.  I think I was getting a bit of flare here.  There was some very expired Ilford paper lying around the darkroom and I printed using that to see if I could get it to resemble a very old photograph.

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I can’t remember which of these I printed so here are both, I always try to bracket.

Denim and Tumbleweed 4×5

Denim and Tumbleweed.  These were the first pictures I developed that didn’t look like they were on the verge of self-destructing.  I think that shooting a film I knew pretty well helped out a bit there, plus using the Fink-Roselieve tank turned out to be much less accident-prone.

Less, though there are still some irregularities but all in all much better than the first batch.  I’m quite fond of these.

Scanning 4×5 Large Format Film

…using the Epson Expression 10000XL in the Visual Resource Center at UCCS.  The Epson software took a few minutes to set up but I suppose that it’s nice that once everything is calibrated I just hit the scan button and go off to do something else for about 20-30 minutes.  Or once a few images are done I’ve started working on those in Photoshop and backing everything up while I wait.  Also I’m writing this post (though as you read it it’s months later).

What do I think of the Epson Expression?  It’s as big a piece of crap as the V600 but at least it does 4×5 film.  It’s the only scanner on campus that can do large format.  Thanks to this site I found out that I could only do 2400dpi scans, but considering how long it takes to do those I don’t think I’d have the patience to let it do longer.  One thing I noticed, is that you must keep track of this:

(7 min. my ass…)
If the scanner isn’t making noise for a while, click that to get the damn thing working again; it’s like the scanner went out for a smoke break and needs to be kicked back into the building to do some work.

I’ve been printing some of these in the darkroom as well, but now that I have digital access to all my negatives I can see things I would have earlier, like where the dust has been caked in, just how bad my developing technique was starting out, how many times I missed focus (I think I should be using a loupe), things like that.  And the successes are quite successful, here’s an example:

Cowboy weaponry at the ready.  Kodak T-Max 400 pulled 1 stop.  

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